insomnia

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Insomnia, also known as sleeplessness, is a sleep disorder in which people have trouble sleeping. They may have difficulty falling asleep, or staying asleep as long as desired. Insomnia is typically followed by daytime sleepiness, low energy, irritability, and a depressed mood. It may result in an increased risk of motor vehicle collisions, as well as problems focusing and learning. Insomnia can be short term, lasting for days or weeks, or long term, lasting more than a month.

Insomnia can occur independently or as a result of another problem. Conditions that can result in insomnia include psychological stress, chronic pain, heart failure, hyperthyroidism, heartburn, restless leg syndrome, menopause, certain medications, and drugs such as caffeine, nicotine, and alcohol. Other risk factors include working night shifts and sleep apnea. Diagnosis is based on sleep habits and an examination to look for underlying causes. A sleep study may be done to look for underlying sleep disorders. Screening may be done with two questions: "do you experience difficulty sleeping?" and "do you have difficulty falling or staying asleep?"

Sleep hygiene and lifestyle changes are typically the first treatment for insomnia. Sleep hygiene includes a consistent bedtime, a quiet and dark room, exposure to sunlight during the day and regular exercise. Cognitive behavioral therapy may be added to this. While sleeping pills may help, they are associated with injuries, dementia, and addiction. These medications are not recommended for more than four or five weeks. The effectiveness and safety of alternative medicine is unclear.

Between 10% and 30% of adults have insomnia at any given point in time and up to half of people have insomnia in a given year. About 6% of people have insomnia that is not due to another problem and lasts for more than a month. People over the age of 65 are affected more often than younger people. Females are more often affected than males. Descriptions of insomnia occur at least as far back as ancient Greece.

Symptoms of insomnia:

Sleep onset insomnia is difficulty falling asleep at the beginning of the night, often a symptom of anxiety disorders. Delayed sleep phase disorder can be misdiagnosed as insomnia, as sleep onset is delayed to much later than normal while awakening spills over into daylight hours.

It is common for patients who have difficulty falling asleep to also have nocturnal awakenings with difficulty returning to sleep. Two-thirds of these patients wake up in the middle of the night, with more than half having trouble falling back to sleep after a middle-of-the-night awakening.

Early morning awakening is an awakening occurring earlier (more than 30 minutes) than desired with an inability to go back to sleep, and before total sleep time reaches 6.5 hours. Early morning awakening is often a characteristic of depression. Anxiety symptoms may well lead to insomnia. Some of these symptoms include tension, compulsive worrying about the future, feeling overstimulated, and overanalyzing past events.

Poor sleep quality can occur as a result of, for example, restless legs, sleep apnea or major depression. Poor sleep quality is defined as the individual not reaching stage 3 or delta sleep which has restorative properties.

Major depression leads to alterations in the function of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, causing excessive release of cortisol which can lead to poor sleep quality.

Nocturnal polyuria, excessive nighttime urination, can be very disturbing to sleep.

Some cases of insomnia are not really insomnia in the traditional sense, because people experiencing sleep state misperception often sleep for a normal amount of time. The problem is that, despite sleeping for multiple hours each night and typically not experiencing significant daytime sleepiness or other symptoms of sleep loss, they do not feel like they have slept very much, if at all. Because their perception of their sleep is incomplete, they incorrectly believe it takes them an abnormally long time to fall asleep, and they underestimate how long they remain asleep.

Symptoms of insomnia can be caused by or be associated with:

Sleep studies using polysomnography have suggested that people who have sleep disruption have elevated nighttime levels of circulating cortisol and adrenocorticotropic hormone. They also have an elevated metabolic rate, which does not occur in people who do not have insomnia but whose sleep is intentionally disrupted during a sleep study. Studies of brain metabolism using positron emission tomography (PET) scans indicate that people with insomnia have higher metabolic rates by night and by day. The question remains whether these changes are the causes or consequences of long-term insomnia.

Heritability estimates of insomnia vary between 38% in males to 59% in females. A genome-wide association study (GWAS) identified 3 genomic loci and 7 genes that influence the risk of insomnia, and showed that insomnia is highly polygenic. In particular, a strong positive association was observed for the MEIS1 gene in both males and females. This study showed that the genetic architecture of insomnia strongly overlaps with psychiatric disorders and metabolic traits.

It has been hypothesised that the epigenetics might also influence insomnia through a controlling process of both sleep regulation and brain-stress response having an impact as well on the brain plasticity.

Alcohol is often used as a form of self-treatment of insomnia to induce sleep. However, alcohol use to induce sleep can be a cause of insomnia. Long-term use of alcohol is associated with a decrease in NREM stage 3 and 4 sleep as well as suppression of REM sleep and REM sleep fragmentation. Frequent moving between sleep stages occurs, with awakenings due to headaches, the need to urinate, dehydration, and excessive sweating. Glutamine rebound also plays a role as when someone is drinking; alcohol inhibits glutamine, one of the body's natural stimulants. When the person stops drinking, the body tries to make up for lost time by producing more glutamine than it needs. The increase in glutamine levels stimulates the brain while the drinker is trying to sleep, keeping him/her from reaching the deepest levels of sleep. Stopping chronic alcohol use can also lead to severe insomnia with vivid dreams. During withdrawal REM sleep is typically exaggerated as part of a rebound effect.

Like alcohol, benzodiazepines, such as alprazolam, clonazepam, lorazepam, and diazepam, are commonly used to treat insomnia in the short-term (both prescribed and self-medicated), but worsen sleep in the long-term. While benzodiazepines can put people to sleep (i.e., inhibit NREM stage 1 and 2 sleep), while asleep, the drugs disrupt sleep architecture: decreasing sleep time, delaying time to REM sleep, and decreasing deep slow-wave sleep (the most restorative part of sleep for both energy and mood).

Opioid medications such as hydrocodone, oxycodone, and morphine are used for insomnia that is associated with pain due to their analgesic properties and hypnotic effects. Opioids can fragment sleep and decrease REM and stage 2 sleep. By producing analgesia and sedation, opioids may be appropriate in carefully selected patients with pain-associated insomnia. However, dependence on opioids can lead to long-term sleep disturbances.

Insomnia affects people of all age groups but people in the following groups have a higher chance of acquiring insomnia.

Two main models exists as to the mechanism of insomnia, (1) cognitive and (2) physiological. The cognitive model suggests rumination and hyperarousal contribute to preventing a person from falling asleep and might lead to an episode of insomnia.

The physiological model is based upon three major findings in people with insomnia; firstly, increased urinary cortisol and catecholamines have been found suggesting increased activity of the HPA axis and arousal; second increased global cerebral glucose utilization during wakefulness and NREM sleep in people with insomnia; and lastly increased full body metabolism and heart rate in those with insomnia. All these findings taken together suggest a dysregulation of the arousal system, cognitive system, and HPA axis all contributing to insomnia. However, it is unknown if the hyperarousal is a result of, or cause of insomnia. Altered levels of the inhibitory neurotransmitter GABA have been found, but the results have been inconsistent, and the implications of altered levels of such a ubiquitous neurotransmitter are unknown. Studies on whether insomnia is driven by circadian control over sleep or a wake dependent process have shown inconsistent results, but some literature suggests a dysregulation of the circadian rhythm based on core temperature. Increased beta activity and decreased delta wave activity has been observed on electroencephalograms; however, the implication of this is unknown.

Around half of post-menopausal women experience sleep disturbances, and generally sleep disturbance is about twice as common in women as men; this appears to be due in part, but not completely, to changes in hormone levels, especially in and post-menopause.

Changes in sex hormones in both men and women as they age may account in part for increased prevalence of sleep disorders in older people.

In medicine, insomnia is widely measured using the Athens insomnia scale. It is measured using eight different parameters related to sleep, finally represented as an overall scale which assesses an individual's sleep pattern.

A qualified sleep specialist should be consulted for the diagnosis of any sleep disorder so the appropriate measures can be taken. Past medical history and a physical examination need to be done to eliminate other conditions that could be the cause of insomnia. After all other conditions are ruled out a comprehensive sleep history should be taken. The sleep history should include sleep habits, medications (prescription and non-prescription), alcohol consumption, nicotine and caffeine intake, co-morbid illnesses, and sleep environment. A sleep diary can be used to keep track of the individual's sleep patterns. The diary should include time to bed, total sleep time, time to sleep onset, number of awakenings, use of medications, time of awakening, and subjective feelings in the morning. The sleep diary can be replaced or validated by the use of out-patient actigraphy for a week or more, using a non-invasive device that measures movement.

Workers who complain of insomnia should not routinely have polysomnography to screen for sleep disorders. This test may be indicated for patients with symptoms in addition to insomnia, including sleep apnea, obesity, a thick neck diameter, or high-risk fullness of the flesh in the oropharynx. Usually, the test is not needed to make a diagnosis, and insomnia especially for working people can often be treated by changing a job schedule to make time for sufficient sleep and by improving sleep hygiene.

Some patients may need to do an overnight sleep study to determine if insomnia is present. Such a study will commonly involve assessment tools including a polysomnogram and the multiple sleep latency test. Specialists in sleep medicine are qualified to diagnose disorders within the, according to the ICSD, 81 major sleep disorder diagnostic categories. Patients with some disorders, including delayed sleep phase disorder, are often mis-diagnosed with primary insomnia; when a person has trouble getting to sleep and awakening at desired times, but has a normal sleep pattern once asleep, a circadian rhythm disorder is a likely cause.

In many cases, insomnia is co-morbid with another disease, side-effects from medications, or a psychological problem. Approximately half of all diagnosed insomnia is related to psychiatric disorders. In depression in many cases "insomnia should be regarded as a co-morbid condition, rather than as a secondary one;" insomnia typically predates psychiatric symptoms. "In fact, it is possible that insomnia represents a significant risk for the development of a subsequent psychiatric disorder." Insomnia occurs in between 60% and 80% of people with depression. This may partly be due to treatment used for depression.

Determination of causation is not necessary for a diagnosis.

The DSM-5 criteria for insomnia include the following:

Predominant complaint of dissatisfaction with sleep quantity or quality, associated with one (or more) of the following symptoms:

In addition,

Insomnia can be classified as transient, acute, or chronic.

Prevention and treatment of insomnia may require a combination of cognitive behavioral therapy, medications, and lifestyle changes.

Among lifestyle practices, going to sleep and waking up at the same time each day can create a steady pattern which may help to prevent insomnia. Avoidance of vigorous exercise and caffeinated drinks a few hours before going to sleep is recommended, while exercise earlier in the day may be beneficial. Other practices to improve sleep hygiene may include:

It is recommended to rule out medical and psychological causes before deciding on the treatment for insomnia. Cognitive behavioral therapy is generally the first line treatment once this has been done. It has been found to be effective for chronic insomnia. The beneficial effects, in contrast to those produced by medications, may last well beyond the stopping of therapy.

Medications have been used mainly to reduce symptoms in insomnia of short duration; their role in the management of chronic insomnia remains unclear. Several different types of medications may be used. Many doctors do not recommend relying on prescription sleeping pills for long-term use. It is also important to identify and treat other medical conditions that may be contributing to insomnia, such as depression, breathing problems, and chronic pain. Many people with insomnia remain insufficiently treated as of 2003.

Non-medication based strategies have comparable efficacy to hypnotic medication for insomnia and they may have longer lasting effects. Hypnotic medication is only recommended for short-term use because dependence with rebound withdrawal effects upon discontinuation or tolerance can develop.

Non medication based strategies provide long lasting improvements to insomnia and are recommended as a first line and long-term strategy of management. Behavioral sleep medicine (BSM) tries to address insomnia with non-pharmacological treatments. The BSM strategies used to address chronic insomnia include attention to sleep hygiene, stimulus control, behavioral interventions, sleep-restriction therapy, paradoxical intention, patient education, and relaxation therapy. Some examples are keeping a journal, restricting the time spent awake in bed, practicing relaxation techniques, and maintaining a regular sleep schedule and a wake-up time. Behavioral therapy can assist a patient in developing new sleep behaviors to improve sleep quality and consolidation. Behavioral therapy may include, learning healthy sleep habits to promote sleep relaxation, undergoing light therapy to help with worry-reduction strategies and regulating the circadian clock.

Music may improve insomnia in adults (see music and sleep). EEG biofeedback has demonstrated effectiveness in the treatment of insomnia with improvements in duration as well as quality of sleep. Self-help therapy (defined as a psychological therapy that can be worked through on one's own) may improve sleep quality for adults with insomnia to a small or moderate degree.

Stimulus control therapy is a treatment for patients who have conditioned themselves to associate the bed, or sleep in general, with a negative response. As stimulus control therapy involves taking steps to control the sleep environment, it is sometimes referred interchangeably with the concept of sleep hygiene. Examples of such environmental modifications include using the bed for sleep or sex only, not for activities such as reading or watching television; waking up at the same time every morning, including on weekends; going to bed only when sleepy and when there is a high likelihood that sleep will occur; leaving the bed and beginning an activity in another location if sleep does not result in a reasonably brief period of time after getting into bed (commonly ~20 min); reducing the subjective effort and energy expended trying to fall asleep; avoiding exposure to bright light during nighttime hours, and eliminating daytime naps.

A component of stimulus control therapy is sleep restriction, a technique that aims to match the time spent in bed with actual time spent asleep. This technique involves maintaining a strict sleep-wake schedule, sleeping only at certain times of the day and for specific amounts of time to induce mild sleep deprivation. Complete treatment usually lasts up to 3 weeks and involves making oneself sleep for only a minimum amount of time that they are actually capable of on average, and then, if capable (i.e. when sleep efficiency improves), slowly increasing this amount (~15 min) by going to bed earlier as the body attempts to reset its internal sleep clock. Bright light therapy may be effective for insomnia.

Paradoxical intention is a cognitive reframing technique where the insomniac, instead of attempting to fall asleep at night, makes every effort to stay awake (i.e. essentially stops trying to fall asleep). One theory that may explain the effectiveness of this method is that by not voluntarily making oneself go to sleep, it relieves the performance anxiety that arises from the need or requirement to fall asleep, which is meant to be a passive act. This technique has been shown to reduce sleep effort and performance anxiety and also lower subjective assessment of sleep-onset latency and overestimation of the sleep deficit (a quality found in many insomniacs).

Sleep hygiene is a common term for all of the behaviors which relate to the promotion of good sleep. They include habits which provide a good foundation for sleep and help to prevent insomnia. However, sleep hygiene alone may not be adequate to address chronic insomnia. Sleep hygiene recommendations are typically included as one component of cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBT-I). Recommendations include reducing caffeine, nicotine, and alcohol consumption, maximizing the regularity and efficiency of sleep episodes, minimizing medication usage and daytime napping, the promotion of regular exercise, and the facilitation of a positive sleep environment. Exercise can be helpful when establishing a routine for sleep but should not be done close to the time that you are planning on going to sleep. The creation of a positive sleep environment may also be helpful in reducing the symptoms of insomnia. In order to create a positive sleep environment one should remove objects that can cause worry or distressful thoughts from view.[citation needed]

There is some evidence that cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBT-I) is superior in the long-term to benzodiazepines and the nonbenzodiazepines in the treatment and management of insomnia. In this therapy, patients are taught improved sleep habits and relieved of counter-productive assumptions about sleep. Common misconceptions and expectations that can be modified include

Numerous studies have reported positive outcomes of combining cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia treatment with treatments such as stimulus control and the relaxation therapies. Hypnotic medications are equally effective in the short-term treatment of insomnia, but their effects wear off over time due to tolerance. The effects of CBT-I have sustained and lasting effects on treating insomnia long after therapy has been discontinued. The addition of hypnotic medications with CBT-I adds no benefit in insomnia. The long lasting benefits of a course of CBT-I shows superiority over pharmacological hypnotic drugs. Even in the short term when compared to short-term hypnotic medication such as zolpidem, CBT-I still shows significant superiority. Thus CBT-I is recommended as a first line treatment for insomnia.

CBT is the well-accepted form of therapy for insomnia since it has no known adverse effects, whereas taking medications to alleviate insomnia symptoms have been shown to have adverse side effects. Nevertheless, the downside of CBT is that it may take a lot of time and motivation.

Metacognition is a recent trend in approach to behaviour therapy of insomnia.

Despite the therapeutic effectiveness and proven success of CBT, treatment availability is significantly limited by a lack of trained clinicians, poor geographical distribution of knowledgeable professionals, and expense. One way to potentially overcome these barriers is to use the Internet to deliver treatment, making this effective intervention more accessible and less costly. The Internet has already become a critical source of health-care and medical information. Although the vast majority of health websites provide general information, there is growing research literature on the development and evaluation of Internet interventions.

These online programs are typically behaviorally-based treatments that have been operationalized and transformed for delivery via the Internet. They are usually highly structured; automated or human supported; based on effective face-to-face treatment; personalized to the user; interactive; enhanced by graphics, animations, audio, and possibly video; and tailored to provide follow-up and feedback.

There is good evidence for the use of computer based CBT for insomnia.

Many people with insomnia use sleeping tablets and other sedatives. In some places medications are prescribed in over 95% of cases. They, however, are a second line treatment. In 2019, the US Food and Drug Administration stated it is going to require warnings for eszopiclone, zaleplon, and zolpidem, due to concerns about serious injuries resulting from abnormal sleep behaviors, including sleepwalking or driving a vehicle while asleep.

The percentage of adults using a prescription sleep aid increases with age. During 2005–2010, about 4% of U.S. adults aged 20 and over reported that they took prescription sleep aids in the past 30 days. Rates of use were lowest among the youngest age group (those aged 20–39) at about 2%, increased to 6% among those aged 50–59, and reached 7% among those aged 80 and over. More adult women (5%) reported using prescription sleep aids than adult men (3%). Non-Hispanic white adults reported higher use of sleep aids (5%) than non-Hispanic black (3%) and Mexican-American (2%) adults. No difference was shown between non-Hispanic black adults and Mexican-American adults in use of prescription sleep aids.

As an alternative to taking prescription drugs, some evidence shows that an average person seeking short-term help may find relief by taking over-the-counter antihistamines such as diphenhydramine or doxylamine. Diphenhydramine and doxylamine are widely used in nonprescription sleep aids. They are the most effective over-the-counter sedatives currently available, at least in much of Europe, Canada, Australia, and the United States, and are more sedating than some prescription hypnotics. Antihistamine effectiveness for sleep may decrease over time, and anticholinergic side-effects (such as dry mouth) may also be a drawback with these particular drugs. While addiction does not seem to be an issue with this class of drugs, they can induce dependence and rebound effects upon abrupt cessation of use.[citation needed] However, people whose insomnia is caused by restless legs syndrome may have worsened symptoms with antihistamines.

The evidence for melatonin in treating insomnia is generally poor. There is low quality evidence that it may speed the onset of sleep by 6 minutes. Ramelteon, a melatonin receptor agonist, does not appear to speed the onset of sleep or the amount of sleep a person gets.

Most melatonin drugs have not been tested for longitudinal side effects. Prolonged-release melatonin may improve quality of sleep in older people with minimal side effects.

Studies have also shown that children who are on the Autism spectrum or have learning disabilities, Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) or related neurological diseases can benefit from the use of melatonin. This is because they often have trouble sleeping due to their disorders. For example, children with ADHD tend to have trouble falling asleep because of their hyperactivity and, as a result, tend to be tired during most of the day. Another cause of insomnia in children with ADHD is the use of stimulants used to treat their disorder. Children who have ADHD then, as well as the other disorders mentioned, may be given melatonin before bedtime in order to help them sleep.

While insomnia is a common symptom of depression, antidepressants are effective for treating sleep problems whether or not they are associated with depression. While all antidepressants help regulate sleep, some antidepressants such as amitriptyline, doxepin, mirtazapine, and trazodone can have an immediate sedative effect, and are prescribed to treat insomnia. Amitriptyline and doxepin both have antihistaminergic, anticholinergic, and antiadrenergic properties, which contribute to both their therapeutic effects and side effect profiles, while mirtazapine's side effects are primarily antihistaminergic, and trazodone's side-effects are primarily antiadrenergic. Mirtazapine is known to decrease sleep latency (i.e., the time it takes to fall asleep), promoting sleep efficiency and increasing the total amount of sleeping time in people with both depression and insomnia.

Agomelatine, a melatonergic antidepressant with sleep-improving qualities that does not cause daytime drowsiness, is licensed for marketing in the European Union and TGA Australia. After trials in the United States its development for use there was discontinued in October 2011 by Novartis, who had bought the rights to market it there from the European pharmaceutical company Servier.

A 2018 Cochrane review found the safety of taking antidepressants for insomnia to be uncertain with no evidence supporting long term use.

The most commonly used class of hypnotics for insomnia are the benzodiazepines.:363 Benzodiazepines are not significantly better for insomnia than antidepressants. Chronic users of hypnotic medications for insomnia do not have better sleep than chronic insomniacs not taking medications. In fact, chronic users of hypnotic medications have more regular nighttime awakenings than insomniacs not taking hypnotic medications. Many have concluded that these drugs cause an unjustifiable risk to the individual and to public health and lack evidence of long-term effectiveness. It is preferred that hypnotics be prescribed for only a few days at the lowest effective dose and avoided altogether wherever possible, especially in the elderly. Between 1993 and 2010, the prescribing of benzodiazepines to individuals with sleep disorders has decreased from 24% to 11% in the US, coinciding with the first release of nonbenzodiazepines.

The benzodiazepine and nonbenzodiazepine hypnotic medications also have a number of side-effects such as day time fatigue, motor vehicle crashes and other accidents, cognitive impairments, and falls and fractures. Elderly people are more sensitive to these side-effects. Some benzodiazepines have demonstrated effectiveness in sleep maintenance in the short term but in the longer term benzodiazepines can lead to tolerance, physical dependence, benzodiazepine withdrawal syndrome upon discontinuation, and long-term worsening of sleep, especially after consistent usage over long periods of time. Benzodiazepines, while inducing unconsciousness, actually worsen sleep as – like alcohol – they promote light sleep while decreasing time spent in deep sleep. A further problem is, with regular use of short-acting sleep aids for insomnia, daytime rebound anxiety can emerge. Although there is little evidence for benefit of benzodiazepines in insomnia compared to other treatments and evidence of major harm, prescriptions have continued to increase. This is likely due to their addictive nature, both due to misuse and because – through their rapid action, tolerance and withdrawal they can "trick" insomniacs into thinking they are helping with sleep. There is a general awareness that long-term use of benzodiazepines for insomnia in most people is inappropriate and that a gradual withdrawal is usually beneficial due to the adverse effects associated with the long-term use of benzodiazepines and is recommended whenever possible.

Benzodiazepines all bind unselectively to the GABAA receptor. Some theorize that certain benzodiazepines (hypnotic benzodiazepines) have significantly higher activity at the α1 subunit of the GABAA receptor compared to other benzodiazepines (for example, triazolam and temazepam have significantly higher activity at the α1 subunit compared to alprazolam and diazepam, making them superior sedative-hypnotics – alprazolam and diazepam, in turn, have higher activity at the α2 subunit compared to triazolam and temazepam, making them superior anxiolytic agents). Modulation of the α1 subunit is associated with sedation, motor impairment, respiratory depression, amnesia, ataxia, and reinforcing behavior (drug-seeking behavior). Modulation of the α2 subunit is associated with anxiolytic activity and disinhibition. For this reason, certain benzodiazepines may be better suited to treat insomnia than others.[citation needed]

Drugs that may prove more effective and safer than benzodiazepines for insomnia is an area of active research. Nonbenzodiazepine sedative-hypnotic drugs, such as zolpidem, zaleplon, zopiclone, and eszopiclone, are a class of hypnotic medications that are similar to benzodiazepines in their mechanism of action, and indicated for mild to moderate insomnia. Their effectiveness at improving time to sleeping is slight, and they have similar – though potentially less severe – side effect profiles compared to benzodiazepines.

Suvorexant is FDA approved for insomnia, characterized by difficulties with sleep onset and/or sleep maintenance. Prescribing of nonbenzodiazepines has seen a general increase since their initial release on the US market in 1992, from 2.3% in 1993 among individuals with sleep disorders to 13.7% in 2010.

Barbiturates, while once used, are no longer recommended for insomnia due to the risk of addiction and other side affects.

The use of antipsychotics for insomnia, while common, is not recommended as the evidence does not demonstrate a benefit and the risk of adverse effects is significant. Concerns regarding side effects is greater in the elderly.

Herbs such as valerian, chamomile, lavender, or cannabis, may be used, but there is no clinical evidence that they are effective. It is unclear if acupuncture is useful.

A survey of 1.1 million residents in the United States found that those that reported sleeping about 7 hours per night had the lowest rates of mortality, whereas those that slept for fewer than 6 hours or more than 8 hours had higher mortality rates. Getting 8.5 or more hours of sleep per night was associated with a 15% higher mortality rate. Severe insomnia – sleeping less than 3.5 hours in women and 4.5 hours in men – is associated with a 15% increase in mortality.

With this technique, it is difficult to distinguish lack of sleep caused by a disorder which is also a cause of premature death, versus a disorder which causes a lack of sleep, and the lack of sleep causing premature death. Most of the increase in mortality from severe insomnia was discounted after controlling for associated disorders. After controlling for sleep duration and insomnia, use of sleeping pills was also found to be associated with an increased mortality rate.

The lowest mortality was seen in individuals who slept between six and a half and seven and a half hours per night. Even sleeping only 4.5 hours per night is associated with very little increase in mortality. Thus, mild to moderate insomnia for most people is associated with increased longevity and severe insomnia is associated only with a very small effect on mortality. It is unclear why sleeping longer than 7.5 hours is associated with excess mortality.

Between 10% and 30% of adults have insomnia at any given point in time and up to half of people have insomnia in a given year. About 6% of people have insomnia that is not due to another problem and lasts for more than a month. People over the age of 65 are affected more often than younger people. Females are more often affected than males. Insomnia is 40% more common in women than in men.

There are higher rates of insomnia reported among university students compared to the general population.

The word insomnia is from Latin: in + somnus "without sleep" and -ia as nominalizing suffix.

The popular press have published stories about people who supposedly never sleep, such as that of Thái Ngọc, and Al Herpin Horne writes "everybody sleeps and needs to do so;" and generally this appears true. However, he also relates from contemporary accounts the case of Paul Kern, who was shot in wartime and then "never slept again" until his death in 1943. Kern appears to be a completely isolated, unique case.

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Insomnia is particularly cruel because you think “ok well I might as well get up and get the day started” and you s…
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S/O to The Insomnia Posse
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Google searches about strange dreams and insomnia at all-time high
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insomnia has been killing me lately
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@Syafiqmalikk1 Gua pikir adit insomnia
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@andryforharry Pido perdón 😭
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I've really been struggling with sleep recently so I have written a blog all about it. Sleep & Insomnia. Hopefully…
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RT @siyeonghwa: se algum insomnia ver isso, por favor da rt as meninas estão concorrendo ao weekly best clip do show champion e a única co…
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@yuadeath 旧版はアスカ、新版はレイを推すと幸せになれます(なれません)(キモオタスマイル)
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I think I’m bout to get me some insomnia cookies
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Seketika insomnia. 😔
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RT @kihyunbread: shownu went to the hospital because of insomnia but he fell asleep at the hospital when he had to listen to the hour and a…
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@SharonR_MECFS @Sabrina_Poirier What combination & ratio of CBD/THC works for insomnia please?
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RT @yubintheprince: CONGRATULATIONS DREAMCATCHER AND INSOMNIA FOR WINNING THE MOST ROBBED GG/FANDOM👏👏
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Google searches about strange dreams and insomnia at all-time high via @abc7
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@MarkJinGyeom93 Hahaha insomnia lang talaga ang meron siya hahahaha ngayon tanungin mo ako ano ang cause ng insomnia niya 😂😂😂
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I HATE insomnia!😩 And late night hunger!😖
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RT @kihyunbread: shownu went to the hospital because of insomnia but he fell asleep at the hospital when he had to listen to the hour and a…
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Insomnia got a grip on me 😭
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RT @KeithRSteele: Breaking news: scientists find cure for insomnia.
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[#Handong] Van a ver #MCOUNTDOWN esta noche en vivo, ¿cierto? Nos vemos entonces~ ^^ Trans EN: @7_DREAMERS Trans…
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@Insomnia_0105 同じく(´•ω•`)
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Insomnia's fav
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@wilo_hiei Kimi wa Houkago Insomnia
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RT @shrekyooh: imagine like in the future, what if you can put your past kpop fandom as credentials for job applications,,, and we go like…
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RT @Kunzitoons: #GoodNightEveryone What a day! Whew, I'm ready for a couple of sprays of our sleep support product and out I go for the res…
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So, when should I talk to a medical professional about my insomnia?
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@todderic_ Nope i have insomnia
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used to fall asleep in the middle of drinking some quintuple shot Starbucks monstrosity and now the sight of a coff…
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初めて自分のお小遣いで買ったCDがTreeで、初めて1人でライブに行ったのがTarkusで、初めて関西より西に行ったのがINSOMNIA TRAINで、初めてTwitterでリプをもらったのがラブさんで、初めて学校を早退したのがF…
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I’ve had more enjoyable sessions of colonic irrigation... than watching #TOTCHE . This is a cure for insomnia ...…
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@SeanzDesignz If you are looking at pills as a medication, the you won't possibly find a cure. In fact, popping pil…
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Ekaro and morning! I am still suffering from intense insomnia! But send in those questions via the website for the QandA today!
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Hello, French InSomnia here~ what are the funny things about France that you remembered ? 😊 @arirang_ASC #DREAMCATCHER_ASC_Fan
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RT @LSY__archive: 시연 수박게임🍉 재미로 만들어 봤습니다💙 #드림캐쳐 #시연 #DREAMCATCHER #SIYEON
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RT @intohyunins: remember when seungmin called jeongin and jeongin was playing "insomnia" but the song hadn't even been released so seungmi…
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@kasie I'm just up every morning to see your smile, and insomnia. #waytoearly
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Oh god, this going to sleep early was a mistake. I woke up at 1:46am and now I can't get back to sleep because ever…
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@MysticRavenous You’re an amazing person You make amazing works of art Keep doin’ what you’re doin’ cause you’re do…
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@_wrazliwosc Od początku drugiego lockdownu czyli październik
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This insomnia is pretty bad ☠️ 😴
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RT @LSY__archive: 유현이랑 서로 총 겨누는 제스쳐 너무 멋있어😭 오늘도 잘했다 이시연!!!!
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RT @LSY__archive: 이시연 카메라 잡히는데 소리 질렀음. 천사가 왜 이런 누추한 땅에 내려오셧지;;; 진짜 너무 예쁘다 오늘 셀카 백만장 저장하고 싶어😭 '찡이 생축' 보자마자 귀여워서 또 헛웃음 치고 예쁘고 귀엽고 세상 혼자 살아 이시…
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my insomnia hasn't given me more than a couple days off in a row since october... OCTOBER!!!!!
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RT @Whosfan_HANTEO: #Whosfan 🎂2월 1주차 생일 투표 🏆1위 #Dreamcatcher #GAHYEON🏆 #인썸니아 가 응모해준 #드림캐쳐 #가현 의 생일 광고가 뉴욕 타임스퀘어에서 송출 중🎊 Thank you #InSomn…
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Skincare, water & paramore until this insomnia decides to go away
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Falling asleep can be hard when your head is full of thoughts about life. These are 5 simple sleep rituals that are great remedies for insomnia so you can finally stop the sleepless nights. #anxietyrelief
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20 Insomnia Memes For When You Can't Go The Eff To Sleep
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Top 10 Fundamental Steps To Help Improve Sleep and Get Rid of Insomnia
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Rose Wong
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How to Meditate Yourself to Sleep | These meditation techniques are scientifically proven to help you fall asleep. #meditation #sleep #insomnia #meditationtips
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insomnia Pinterest Ideas
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Feb 1, 2021 19:01
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Does bedtime seem to spark an internal dialogue between you and the events in your adventurous life? Believe it or not, there is a way to get your thoughts and sleep to coexist.⁠ ⁠.⁠ Sure, this is easier said than done. But it may help to curiously explore the wisdom in the quote above. ⁠ .⁠ By acknowledging the boundary and purpose of sleep, this wisdom suggests those thoughts you can’t seem to shut off before bed are just an unconscious negotiation between you, thinking, and sleep. ⁠ .⁠ It’s not that you would rather think than sleep, it’s that it would be awesome if you could do both. I mean, wouldn’t it? ⁠ .⁠ But you can’t because that’s not in sleep's design. ⁠ ⁠.⁠ This is why the most effective sleep method is CONCEPT.⁠ Before one’s sleep can coexist with thought, one must understand that thoughts offer no value to sleep, or anything else by the point of bedtime. Thoughts merely exist as an echo with no substance. ⁠ . By understanding this, any strategy you use to approach an active brain will be inherently better, if any strategy is needed at all.⁠ .⁠ .⁠ .⁠ #Insomnia #Insomniac #Boundaries #SleepBoundaries #Thoughts #LifeCoaching #LifeCoach #Sleep #Sleeping #SleepCoach #InsomniaCoach #CreateSpace #SleepHygiene #Mindset⁠
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#lifecoach #insomniacoach #createspace #thoughts #lifecoaching
Feb 1, 2021 19:05
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Drop a 💙and show us some Valentine's love! Treat yourself or your loved one to a self care goodie bag including our products. Order our Better Sleep Bundle today for 20% off and get it delivered on time! #Repose #valentinesgift #selfcare #eyemask #wellness #crueltyfree #selflove #selfcaretips #selfcaredaily #positivevibes #mindfulness #healing #lifestyle #gummybears #gummies #melatoningummies #bedtime #insomnia #migraines #sleepmask #nighttime #nighttimeroutine #melatonin
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#selfcaretips #selflove #selfcare #healing #sleepmask
Feb 1, 2021 19:09
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— GOODNIGHTSTAGRAM— SIYEON🐺 [INSTAGRAM] 210201 goodnight_dreamcatcher Instagram Update 🔗 https://t.co/34jk0jDopg Cr. 7_DREAMERS #dreamcatcher #insomnia #happyfaceentertainment #gband  #jiu #sua #siyeon #handong #yoohyeon #dami #gahyeon #kpop #kpopgirlgroup #kpopgirls #dreamcatcherkpop #드림캐쳐 #l4l #f4f #follow #poland #international #polishfans #internationalfans✨⭐
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#kpopgirls #dreamcatcherkpop #dami #follow #sua
Feb 1, 2021 19:11
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🌛 #moon #secrets #nightowl #insomnia #pagan #pagansofinstagram #heathen #heathensofinstagram #witch #witchesofinstagram #strega #witchyvibes #life #mood #vibe #crystal
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#pagansofinstagram #life #strega #pagan #witch
Feb 1, 2021 19:11
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그것은 좋은 것으로 되어 있었다 . . . #atencyjnerowery #szybkiefurydobredupy #zielonekaczki #zolteananasy #pl00dy #lodyplody #s00ki #aesthetic #kpop #anime #atiny #monbebe #moomoos #shy #shygirl #blackrose #luvity #tomoon #insomnia #midzy #once #gem #shawols #beauty #aestheticphoto #vintage #ullzang #cute #neverland #blink
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#cute #luvity #pl00dy #kpop #aestheticphoto
Feb 1, 2021 19:13
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— GOODNIGHTSTAGRAM [INSTAGRAM] 210201 goodnight_dreamcatcher Instagram Update 🔗 https://t.co/34jk0jDopg Cr. 7_DREAMERS #dreamcatcher #insomnia #happyfaceentertainment #gband  #siyeon #kpop #kpopgirlgroup #kpopgirls #dreamcatcherkpop #시연 #드림캐쳐 #l4l #f4f #follow #poland #international #polishfans #internationalfans✨⭐🌙
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#kpopgirlgroup #siyeon #dreamcatcher #kpop #international
Feb 1, 2021 19:17
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Efek insomnia, malam-malam begini masih ngga bisa diam 🙈 #cireng #cirengenak #foodfotography #foodblogfeed #foodies #hobimasakid #insomnia
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#cirengenak #foodfotography #cireng #insomnia #foodies
Feb 1, 2021 19:20
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. Repeat order lagi dan lagi 🤗❤️ . Beliau sangat puashati dengan produk thewoomanpotion. Bukan 1 tapi dah beli botol ke 5 🥰🤩 . Terima kasih support 🙏 . #thewooman #mywooman #babywooman #feedback #customerpuashati #moodbooster #multifunctionaloil #repeatorder #intimateparfum #insomnia #deepsleep #extraordinary #allinone #secretweapon #husbandandwife
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#thewooman #feedback #allinone #repeatorder #moodbooster
Feb 1, 2021 19:20
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Siapa saja yang perlu Kalung KK-Liforce ? . . . Orang yang merasa seperti : 1. #Vertigo 2. #Insomnia 3. #stroke 4. #hipertensi 5. #parkinson 6 #asma 7. #leherkaku 8. #mataberair 9. #kecanduangame 10. #jantunglemah . Anda atau ada keluarga anda mengalamninya? . Jangan hanya minum obat. Coba terapi kalung kesehatan KK-Liforce. Ikhtiar insyaallah jadi solusi dari penyakitnya 😁 . Info & Pemesanan: ☎ WA: 083166547536 #kalunghits #kalungkekinian #kalungkkliforce #kkliforce #kkliforcepromo #kalungmurah #kalung #kalungmurah #antistroke #antiradiasi #aksesoriswanita#kkliforce #aksesorismurah#kkindonesia
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#hipertensi #kkliforce #aksesoriswanita #jantunglemah #leherkaku
Feb 1, 2021 19:23
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Manfaat Utama KK Liforce : 1. Meredam Bahaya Radiasi Frekuensi Elektro Magnetik (EMF / Electro magnetic Frequency Radiation) 2. Meningkatkan Stamina Dan Daya Tahan Tubuh Setiap sel sehat menghasilkan energi listrik dengan tegangan antara 70-90 mV 3. Melindungi DNA Dari Kerusakan (Mencegah Kanker) 4.Memperlancar Sirkulasi Darah Dan Oksigenasi Tubuh tadinya lengket satu sama lain menjadi terpisah 5. Meningkatkan Fungsi Syaraf Otak dan Memperbaiki Komunikasi Antar Sel Energi 6. Memperbaiki Penyerapan Nutrisi Di Tingkat Sel Perbaikan 7. Meredam Stress Dan Membuat Tidur Lebih Nyenyak 8. Mengurangi Nyeri / Kaku Pada Sendi 9. Pada Penggunaan Secara Umum Skalar Energi Membantu Mengatasi 10. Menyeimbangkan seluruh meridian tubuh (Chi) WA : 083166547536 atau klik link dibio #kalung #kalungkesehatan #kalungantiradiasi #antiradiasi #energiskalar #kkliforce #kkindonesia #sehat #sehatalami #hidupsehat #kesehatan #insomnia #healthy #health #lifestyle #imun #kalungkesehatan#kalungpendant#energiskalar#kalungantiradiasi#peredamradiasi#kalungkkliforce#kkliforcepromo#kkliforcesurabaya#kkliforceenergy#kkliforcemurah#kkliforcemanado
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#kalungkesehatan #kkliforcesurabaya #energiskalar #antiradiasi #peredamradiasi